Shelley Cohen Konrad, PhD, LCSW, FNAP
Director, Professor Center for Excellence in Collaborative Education
University of New England
Shelley Cohen Konrad, PhD, LCSW, FNAP is a Professor at the University of New England School of Social Work and Director of the Center for Excellence in Collaborative Education, an initiative that promotes cross-disciplinary learning, research, collaborative practice and service. Shelley graduated from Boston University and received her MSW and PhD from Simmons University in Boston. Shelley’s scholarly work focuses on patient engagement, health systems hierarchy, IPE and workforce practice, and use of the arts in experiential learning. Shelley lives on the coast of Maine where she enjoys gardening, reading, baking, hiking, and time with family and friends.

Presenting at the Nexus Summit:

Background: Interprofessional education (IPE) research has primarily concentrated on classroom, service-learning, and simulated student learning outcomes. Less is known about how IPE impacts future practice and whether and how knowledge gained in controlled academic environments is positively and enduringly transferred to the workforce. Presentation: This lightning talk offers findings from a mixed-methods study aimed at understanding the transfer of IPE knowledge, attitudes, and skills from campus to collaborative workforce practice. Participants included university alumni who had…
Since 2018, the Nexus Summit has been a space to intentionally explore models of engaging individuals, families, communities and populations in the planning and delivery of health professions education, and as participatory members of the health team. Join this Conversation Café to explore questions of how individuals, families, and caregivers can not only be the center of care delivery, but the co-creators of how health professions are trained and how they practice. Facilitators Shelley Cohen Konrad, Kelley Harmon, and Susan Gold each bring a different lens to the key questions of: How…
Background: Increasing evidence suggests that cross-disciplinary teamwork benefits patient care, reduces provider burden, improves clinical team performance, and is critical to the prevention of medical error (Mayo & Woolley, 2016). Health care teams can achieve more than any one profession can alone, yet they are often fraught with unacknowledged tensions impeding efficacy. Such tensions begin in health education where barriers to interprofessional collaborative learning (IPCL) are both implicit (e.g. unexamined assumptions, stereotypes, and hierarchies), and explicit (e.g. certain…
Join Barbara Brandt, National Center director, and Shelley Cohen Konrad, today’s plenary facilitator, for an open conversation and debrief following today’s Nexus Summit sessions.  Informed by today’s plenary, seminars, lightning talks, and Conversation Cafe, bring your questions, reflections and ideas for an informal conversation as we explore the implications of this important work for every day, for research in the field and for future policy considerations. To contribute to the conversation more broadly, we encourage you to post your ideas on our discussion board.
Learning Objectives Engage in self-reflection on why, and how, switching between our dual identities of care recipient and care provider impacts power and control in interprofessional care. Analyze how the language used by the interprofessional team reflects personal or professional identity, power, and authority Appraise the myths of patient-centeredness. Identity strategies to realign the place of the healthcare team in the life course, health, wellbeing, and decision-making of individuals. This seminar addresses the concepts of power, engagement, participation, and ownership in…